Colors, Coils, and Comprehension
thesinwhisperer:

agoldthatactuallystays:

kingjaffejoffer:

ghettost4r:

You might be cool but you’ll never cool as a Eazy E wearing a Turban 

opulence

black excellence. 

G L A M O U R

thesinwhisperer:

agoldthatactuallystays:

kingjaffejoffer:

ghettost4r:

You might be cool but you’ll never cool as a Eazy E wearing a Turban 

opulence

black excellence. 

G L A M O U R

nok-ind:

Sundiata Keita of Mali, The real lion king

The epic of king Sundiata Keita of Mali was the inspiration for the Disney film the lion king. However the film itself just scratched the surface of the richness in culture, heritage and history of the actual story.

‘David Winiewski’s 1992 picture book version of the african epic “Sundiata, Lion king of Mali” and the actual historical account of the 13th century lion king, Sundiata, are both badly served by Disney’s “The lion king”. Disney has been praised for using african animals as story characters; for using the African landscape as a story setting; for using African artwork as design motifs: and for using african- american actors as the voices for the film characters. If the film succeeds in having African culture accepted by people usually resistant to recognizing any other culture but their own, then it deserves to be noted for this small breach in the racial divide. Nevertheless, in the larger sense, the film diminishes the culturally rich heritage of history and story from which it derives. Sundiata was the 12th son of the king of Mali, and he was viewed by the kings “griot” as destined for greatness. He grew to manhood in exile, but he returned to fight the evil forces of his brother and return the kingdom to it’s rightful sovereignty. The film converts the real heroes private pain and struggle against truly wrenching physical and political disabilities into a screen situation of sentimental, tearjerker shallowness. An interdisciplinary approach would allow English and social studies teachers to present the epic from a historical and literary perspective.’ (Paterno 1994)

This story belongs to be amongst epics such as Gilgamesh from Mesopotamia, ancient Greek the Iliad, Aeneid of Italy and the wonderful story of Beowulf from Anglo-saxon literature.

This is a story of a True king who founded the west African kingdom of Mali an empire whose marvels left a bright heritage of culture, riches enlightenment and ancient wisdom. Infact one of the pearls of this empire Timbuktu, many times over ignited the imagination of western explorers and ironically this same splendour prompted European exploration of the west coast of Africa.

The most notable things from this empire Sundiata, Mansa Musa, Timbuktu, Gold, Islam, Ancient manuscripts, International trade and Commerce.

references :

Paterno, Domenica R.The True Lion King of Africa: The Epic History of Sundiata, King of Old Mali.Education Resources information Center.1994

http://812studio.com/i-love-these-posters/

kittykait04:

gorogoroiu:

honkschraders:

metal-thimble:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

#this is dumb#but i’m desperate

when you got nothing you got nothing to lose

I got a job after reblogging this !

Just got a job

kittykait04:

gorogoroiu:

honkschraders:

metal-thimble:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

when you got nothing you got nothing to lose

I got a job after reblogging this !

Just got a job

beautiesofafrique:

Imazighen women|Tunisia (North Africa)| Rudolf Lehnert Landrock

beautiesofafrique:

Imazighen women|Tunisia (North Africa)| Rudolf Lehnert Landrock

brownskinthings:

See, you don’t have to cut your locs off. Deadlock Removal is an actual process.

brownskinthings:

See, you don’t have to cut your locs off. Deadlock Removal is an actual process.

journalisticjoe:

wrapyourlipsaroundmyname:

Since Retha covered Rolling in the deep can Patti PLEEEAAASSSEEE cover Resentment 

DO NOT MAKE ME WANT THINGS! If patti got hold of Resentment, chile?

It Patti go her hands on Resentment there would be  a new religion called Labelleism and we would all join hands as she kicked her shoes off before hitting a note only known by the gods

princessjanecrocker:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

There is actually a drunk history episode with the story of Robert Smalls and you should totally watch it HERE

Robert Smalls and his BIG plan.

princessjanecrocker:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

There is actually a drunk history episode with the story of Robert Smalls and you should totally watch it HERE

Robert Smalls and his BIG plan.

flaccidtrip:

niggaimdeadass:

tiredestprincess:

unexplained-events:

Duende

A mom (Argentina) captures a strange creature while filming her son. She believes it to be a Duende, which is a fairy or goblin-like creature from Latin American or Filipino folklore.

Video

SOMEONE EXPLAIN THIS

really running too!!! out here!!!!!!!!!!

STOP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

7kgod:

theurbanchica:

//black caucus in d.c. during one of the most epic music months in A-town history. #shawtystillmad

erykah blesses the stage

Ohmygod! Look at thissss!
They are so cute

So are we not going to talk about what is shirt says and how it seems directed at her??? 

Joséphine Baker in Zouzou (1934)

Directed by Marc Allégret